Obejor Blog can say that it has become a trend, especially for young people to sleep with their phones next to them. And most times, beneath the pillow, seems to be the ideal spot to keep the phone as it makes it easy to reach when it rings.

However, what is unknown to a lot of people is that sleeping with your phone close to you can be hazardous to your health.

Smartphones have been proven to emit dangerous radiation which causes an alteration in the system of certain self –regulating the process, such as our biological clock or cardiac rhythm. That’s why Obejor Blog chose to reveal this tips.

You Should Not Sleep With Your Phone
Sleeping with your Smartphone

Here are Some Reasons Why You Should Not Sleep With Your Phone Near You

1. It Puts our Health at Risk due to Emitted Radiation

Generally, mobile phones emit radiation due to transmission signal around 900MHz. Owing to this, keeping cell phones close to the head for prolonged periods can lead to headaches, muscle pains, and other complicated health issues.

Although people tend to keep their phones close to them while they sleep for different reasons, it is, however, better to be safe than sorry.

2. It Could Set your Pillow on Fire

A good number of cell phone users are so attached to their phones that they sleep with them even under their pillow. The result of this habit has led to recorded incidences of pillows being set ablaze.

Most popular of this incidence is the July 2014 teen from Texas who woke up to a burning smell. Her sheet and mattress have been scorched by her Samsung Galaxy S4, which was under her pillow.

It is, therefore, advisable to shut down the transceiver of your cell phone by keeping it on “airplane mode” while you sleep. Or better still; turn it off because cell phones pump out electromagnetic radiation whenever they’re on.

3. It could Prevent you from Sleeping

LED screens, which includes cell phones, tablets, TVs and other gadgets, give off blue light; a type that studies have suggested to impede the production of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin and disrupt our circadian rhythms.

Although the reason for this is yet unknown, it may be because blue light emits wavelengths similar to daylight, which can deceive our bodies to think that it’s daytime, at any time.
It is, therefore, advisable to shut down all electronics two hours before bedtime. And if possible, keep phones and laptops in another room while you sleep.

 

Changes to Make to Improve Sleep

It is clear that phones may be disruptive to the ability to sleep. If you have insomnia, or simply do not get enough sleep, this is a simple change that might help. Reflect on how much your phone may be impacting your sleep environment and consider the following changes:

Place the phone to charge in the kitchen. Allow yourself to go to bed without your phone. If there is an emergency, you will learn about it in the morning. By removing the phone from the bedroom, and placing it to charge in another room such as the kitchen, it is possible to reduce its impact on your sleep.

Get an alarm clock instead of using your phone’s alarm. Although phones can do a lot, sometimes the trade-off of intrusion for convenience is simply not worth it. Buy an inexpensive alarm clock if you need one to wake in the morning on time. Put it across the room and set it to the time you need to get up. As much as possible, don’t look at the clock or check the time at night. If you absolutely must use your phone as your alarm clock (perhaps while traveling), set it to airplane or night mode to reduce disruptions and place it out of reach.

Turn off the sleep-tracking apps. Some people use their phones as a way to track sleep and wake patterns with various apps or even wearable technology. The accuracy of correlating movement to wakefulness and stillness to sleep is highly suspect. Moreover, there is no reason to carefully document every movement (or associated awakening) during the night. It may be disruptive to overanalyze sleep.

Preserve a buffer zone and minimize light at night. Try to protect the last hour (or two) before your bedtime as a time to relax and prepare for sleep. Enjoy some time spent reading, watching television or a movie, or listening to music. Reduce your eye’s exposure to direct light. As able, switch any close screens to night mode (reducing blue light). If you are especially sensitive to light at night, consider eliminating it as much as possible.

Optimize the sleep environment. Consider other ways that you might enhance your bedroom to make it the ultimate sleep sanctuary. Go to bed when you feel sleepy. If you are awake for longer than 20 minutes at night, get up and do something relaxing and return to bed when feeling sleepy. If you are awake towards morning, you might get up and start your day early. Reserve the bed as a space for sleep and sex alone. By making these changes, you will improve the association of the bed as a place for sleep.

Credit: Pulse

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